Washington Symposia

2016 NCSCE Washington Symposium: The Ecosystem of Science Communication: Communicating the Science Solution

Eliza Reilly Ecosystem of Science CommunicationDate
October 21, 2016

Location
AAAS Headquarters
1200 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC 20005

This meeting convened experts in science communication to help educators in high schools, colleges, universities, non-profit organizations, public media, libraries, museums, and other informal education institutions better understand the conflicts between scientific knowledge and personal or political identity, and how to successfully navigate these issues.

In addition to specialists in the NCSCE community who delivered on this topic, we had sessions from partners including Yale University’s Center for Cultural Cognition, the Alan Alda Center for Science Communication, Tangled Bank Studios, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science to share their expertise with meeting participants. Veteran and new members of the NCSCE community also displayed posters highlighting their institutions’ work in science and civic engagement.

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2015 Washington Symposium and SENCER-ISE National Meeting

Former Rep. Rush Holt (NJ-12) and Dr. Ellen Rubenstein of Monmouth University with Dr. Rubenstein's poster about her analysis of local lakes presented at the 2014 NSCSE Washington Symposium Capitol Hill Poster Session

Former Rep. Rush Holt (NJ-12) and Dr. Ellen Rubenstein of Monmouth University with Dr. Rubenstein’s poster about her analysis of local lakes presented at the 2014 NSCSE Washington Symposium Capitol Hill Poster Session

From Nice to Necessary: Science in the Service of Democracy

The Washington Symposium and SENCER-ISE national meeting was an opportunity for members of the SENCER community, and others interested in the intersection of science and public policy to share the results of their projects and demonstrate their impacts on campuses as well as communities. This year’s program had a particular focus on the work of SENCER-Informal Science Education and its partnerships.

The Symposium began on Sunday, September 27 at the Arlington Campus of George Mason University. The opening plenary address on SENCER Synergies with Informal Learning was delivered by David Ucko, a SENCER collaborator and SENCER-ISE senior advisor, followed by invited presentations on integrating the humanities in STEM education, and the work being done at George Mason University on conservation-focused partnerships.

On Monday, September 28, also at George Mason University, our program featured a keynote address from Julia Washburn, the National Park Service’s Associate Director for Interpretation, Education and Volunteers. Marsha Semmel, a SENCER collaborator and SENCER-ISE senior advisor, gave an afternoon keynote about creating a common theme for cultural institutions. Our Monday program will also feature invited presentations and panels showcasing best practices in educational partnerships.

On Tuesday, September 29, in the Capitol Visitor Center on Capitol Hill, we gathered for the Capitol Hill Poster Session, a special program honoring the SENCER Hawaii team for their multi-institutional collaboration and closing remarks.

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2014 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session

2014 Washington SymposiumThe NCSCE Washington Symposium was held on September 28-30, 2014. The theme for this year’s symposium was Science Education, Civic Engagement, and the Role of Evidence in Public Policy.

The Washington Symposium and Poster Session is an opportunity for members of the SENCER community, and others interested in the intersection of science and public policy to share the results of their on-campus projects and demonstrate their impact on campus, as well as their implications for the wider community.

The meeting began September 28 at the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum. Our program will features presentations and a panel discussion with Professor Dan Kahan, professor of law and psychology and director of the Cultural Cognition Project at of Yale University, who helped us think about the challenges of science communication and its relationship to public policy, and Professor Andrew Gelman, professor of statistics and political science and director of the Applied Statistics Center at  Columbia University, who helped us consider “the evidence on evidence.”

On Monday, September 29, the Symposium moved to the headquarters of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition to a presentation from Jessica Wyndham of AAAS, our Monday program featured invited short papers and panel presentations, project updates from current NSF and other supported initiatives in formal and informal education, and presentations by SENCER Leadership Fellows, NCSCE Scholars and others.

On Tuesday, September 30, we moved to the Cannon Caucus Room of the US House of Representatives on Capitol Hill where we gathered for the Capitol Hill Poster Session, the William E. Bennett Award presentation and closing remarks.

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2013 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session

About the Symposium

The Washington Symposium provides NCSCE an opportunity to recognize the great work being done by educators and students to improve STEM education on campus and nationally, as well as opportunity to meet with leaders from around the country.

Participants take part in discussion sessions on improving education, new initiatives, and public policy, such as the new standards, that affect the curricula. Special attention in the program is given to topics of particular interest to our student leaders. Past speakers have included the director of the Board on Science Education, the hosts of NPR’s Science Friday, and officials from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Education, and the Department of Labor.

The Symposium program also traditionally features selected sessions by participants. Participants invited to present posters also have the option of meeting with members of their congressional delegations to discuss how they are working to improve education for their students and for the nation.

2013 Symposium

This year, the Symposium program especially focused on the theme of a ‘tipping point’ regarding the transformation of education, and highlighted plans for the next four years of SENCER and new initiatives.

The program also included sessions that present evidence of what is working in communities to connect science and civic engagement and an exploration of connecting new assessment programs with the theme of last year’s symposium – the emergence of the new standards.

Additional sessions focused on:

  • Science and human rights,
  • Making connections between the higher education and informal science education communities, and
  • Communicating effectively about STEM topics and issues with the public, whether through conversations, the use of social media, radio, etc.

Archived Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session Information

2011 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session
2010 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session
2009 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session
2008 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session
2007 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session
2006 Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session