Leadership

SENCER's work is advised and carried out by a core group of senior scholars and project staff. Together they bring experience in the fields of biochemistry, public health, history, political science, economics, medicine, and international politics. To contact SENCER staff, please call (202) 483-4600.

SENCER Leadership

Meet Our Staff, SENCER PI, and Co-PIs

David Ferguson, Co-Principal Investigator
David Ferguson, Co-Principal Investigator
Monica Devanas, Co-Principal Investigator
Monica Devanas, Co-Principal Investigator
Amy Shachter, Co-Principal Investigator
Amy Shachter, Co-Principal Investigator
Catherine Hurt Middlecamp, Co-Principal Investigator
Catherine Hurt Middlecamp, Co-Principal Investigator

Regional Co-Directors

Meet the leaders of our SENCER Regional Centers for Innovation

Dr. Steven Bachofer, SCI-West Co-Director
Dr. Steven Bachofer, SCI-West Co-Director
Dr. Donald Braid, SCI-Central Plains Co-Director
Dr. Donald Braid, SCI-Central Plains Co-Director
Dr. Kathleen M. Browne, SCI-MidAtlantic Co-Director
Dr. Kathleen M. Browne, SCI-MidAtlantic Co-Director
Dr. Monica Devanas, SCI-MidAtlantic Co-Director
Dr. Monica Devanas, SCI-MidAtlantic Co-Director
Dr. Edward Katz, SCI-South Co-Director
Dr. Edward Katz, SCI-South Co-Director
Dr. Joseph Kirsch, SCI-Central Plains Co-Director
Dr. Joseph Kirsch, SCI-Central Plains Co-Director
Dr. Joseph Koonce, SCI-Great Lakes Co-Director
Dr. Joseph Koonce, SCI-Great Lakes Co-Director
Dr. Keith Krumpe, SCI-South Co-Director
Dr. Keith Krumpe, SCI-South Co-Director
Dr. Marilyn (Lynn) Lotas, SCI-Great Lakes Co-Director
Dr. Marilyn (Lynn) Lotas, SCI-Great Lakes Co-Director
Dr. Cynthia Maguire, SCI-Southwest Co-Director
Dr. Cynthia Maguire, SCI-Southwest Co-Director
Dr. Karen Kashmanian Oates, SCI-New England Co-Director
Dr. Karen Kashmanian Oates, SCI-New England Co-Director
Dr. Susan Reiser, SCI-South Co-Director
Dr. Susan Reiser, SCI-South Co-Director
Dr. Rob Sanford, SCI-New England Co-Director
Dr. Rob Sanford, SCI-New England Co-Director
Dr. Rober Seiser, SCI-Midwest Co-Director
Dr. Rober Seiser, SCI-Midwest Co-Director
Dr. Amy Shachter, SCI-West Co-Director
Dr. Amy Shachter, SCI-West Co-Director
Dr. Richard D. Sheardy, SCI-Southwest Co-Director
Dr. Richard D. Sheardy, SCI-Southwest Co-Director
Dr. Thomas Wood, SCI-Chesapeake Bay Co-Director
Dr. Thomas Wood, SCI-Chesapeake Bay Co-Director
Dr. Winnie Yu, SCI-New England Co-Director
Dr. Winnie Yu, SCI-New England Co-Director
Dr. David Zeng, SCI-Great Lakes Co-Director
Dr. David Zeng, SCI-Great Lakes Co-Director

Senior Scholars and Consultants

Janice Ballou, SENCER Evaluator
Janice Ballou, SENCER Evaluator
William E. Bennett, Senior Scholar
William E. Bennett, Senior Scholar
Jonathan Bucki, Strategic Planning Consultant
Jonathan Bucki, Strategic Planning Consultant
Chuck Gahun, Project Consultant
Chuck Gahun, Project Consultant
Karen Kashmanian Oates, Senior Fellow
Karen Kashmanian Oates, Senior Fellow
Ellen Mappen, Senior Scholar
Ellen Mappen, Senior Scholar

SENCER Leadership Fellows

In response to community feedback, we have restructured the Fellows program to be an intensive, one-year mentoring experience built around a specific goal that the prospective Leadership Fellow (the mentee) determines in his/her application. Mentors, who will be designated Senior Fellows, will commit to working with a Leadership Fellow to help her/him meet the goal. 

Current and Former Leadership Fellows

Please click on a fellow's name to learn more about his or her area of expertise and interests.

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Dr. Jeff Abernathy, Alma College
President, Alma College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Dr. Jeff Abernathy is president of Alma College, a liberal arts institution located in Michigan. Jeff became involved with SENCER while vice president and dean of Augustana College. In this capacity, he coordinated Augustana’s partnership with SENCER, promoted an environment that encourages the development of SENCER courses at Augustana, and explored whether a suite of SENCER-inspired courses might be created by members of the newly formed consortium with Alma, Luther, Illinois Wesleyan, Gustavus Adolphus and Wittenberg that would focus these courses on global issues and situate them in international settings. 

Dr. Eugene Allevato, Woodbury University
Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, Woodbury University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2010

Eugene Allevato joined Woodbury as an adjunct faculty member in 2001. He teaches Business Statistics, Advanced Statistics, Research Methods, Physical Science and College Algebra. He has implemented the SENCER philosophy in all his courses with significant success. Students gains have excelled expectations and some students projects have been accepted in conferences such as ECOWAVE 2008, NCER (National Conference Ecosystems Restoration-2009) and 2010 International Biomass Conference. Eugene has developed and designed new SENCER courses such as Water Issues in Los Angeles, Spirituality and Quality Management in the Workplace, Environmental Issues Science and Spirituality, and Eco-Ethics. In addition Eugene has introduced inter-classroom collaboration across two different courses and community services engagement based on group projects involving students majors.

Dr. Merrilee Anderson, Mount Aloysius College
Associate Professor and Chair of Science and Mathematics, Merrimack College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008 

Merrilee Anderson

Merrilee works to incorporate active research in undergraduate courses and expand the abandoned mine drainage remediation course and research program at Merrimack College as part of her fellowship. She also participates in SENCER regional activities (especially in forming associations with neighboring colleges), and works to secure support for expanding SENCER projects on campus and the region.

Dr. Sharon Anthony, Northland College
Associate Professor, Environmental Science and Chemistry
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Sharon Anthony is an associate professor of environmental science and chemistry at Northland College who has been involved with SENCER for several years. During her fellowship, Sharon will focus her attention on three projects that involve collaborations on and off-campus. She plans to structure a month-long intensive course, Chemistry of Natural Waters, around water quality and associated issues of the Bad River Watershed. With colleagues, Sharon will develop projects for students in a two-year long learning community centered on food and agricultural issues. For a general chemistry course, Sharon is further refining a three-week module that pushes students to investigate and debate whether or not we should eat fish.

Dr. Erin Argyilan, Indiana University Northwest
Associate Professor of Geosciences, Indiana University Northwest
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012 

Erin ArgyilanErin became involved with SENCER through her role as cluster coordinator for the northwest Indiana and northeast Illinois region in the GLISTEN program. She has since adapted three courses (Global Environmental Change, Field Methods, Principles of Hydrogeology) to the SENCER model and integrated SENCER-based components in to an introductory course in Earth Science.

As a Fellow, Erin plans to promote SENCER on her campus by giving seminars through the Center for Innovation and Scholarship in Teaching and Learning and presenting on the courses that have resulted from combining the GLISTEN and SENCER models. She will also serve as a resource for the integration of SALG as an assessment tool for the university and give seminars at other institutions in the region that have expressed interest in her cluster’s work including community colleges and 4-year institutions in Illinois and Northwest Indiana. She will work with other GLISTEN clusters to synthesize a list of key issues that students would be exposed to in GLISTEN-SENCER courses, and aims to increase development and adoption of GLISTEN-SENCER courses on campuses throughout the Great Lakes by presenting at scientific conferences. Erin will mentor fellow faculty members in implementing these approaches and will connect with future STEM teachers through IUN’s teacher preparation program.

Dr. Keith Aufderheide, Oglethorpe University
Professor of Chemistry, Oglethorpe University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Keith AufderheideKeith is particularly interested in developing strategies to promote sustainability of STEM curricular reforms. Keith is also committed to encouraging productive regional collaborations that use undergraduate courses to tackle regional problems (like traffic) and, in so doing, improve both student learning and the community. Oglethorpe University has been involved with the SENCER community for several years, with several teams and initiatives led by Keith.

Dr. Gillian Backus, Northern Virginia Community College
Professor, Science
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Gillian Backus is a professor of biology at Northern Virginia Community College, Loudoun Campus where she teaches Anatomy and Physiology and Introductory Biology. As a member of a Faculty Learning Community, Gillian and several colleagues have developed a two-credit honors independent study that merges science and art, essentially turning STEM into STEAM. The course has now run twice with great success. She has seen firsthand the deep, meaningful learning that students own as a result of merging humanities with STEM, as well as the vital faculty professional development and collaborations that occur when experts cross disciplinary lines to work together. Gillian earned her Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She then moved to northern Virginia and participated as a Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies of Science. Her fellowship placement at the Koshland Science Museum opened her eyes to the world of informal science education and allowed her to develop educational exhibit materials. Gillian then worked for the US EPA in Washington, D.C., evaluating chemical risk assessment. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree magna cum laude from Mount Holyoke College with a biology major and French minor. As a SENCER Leadership Fellow, Gillian would like to grow the opportunities for humanities and STEM faculty to meet each other, share ideas, and collaborate. 

Dr. Ralph Bain, Montgomery College
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry, Montgomery College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

As a Fellow, Ralph has supported the establishment of SENCER programs at the Rockville Campus of Montgomery College and assisted in extending the SENCER program at Montgomery to courses in physics. He has also contributed to regional SENCER organizations, including offering consultation and mentoring to faculty who desire to improve their science and related courses, laboratory and research programs.

Dr. Pinar Batur, Vassar College
Chair of Environmental Studies, Associate Professor of International Studies and Sociology, Vassar College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Dr. Batur is part of a team of Vassar Leadership Fellow including Stuart Belli and Chris Smart that has worked to promote wider adoption of SENCER principles through workshops and support of regional activities. The team also plans to fully develop and launch a project focused on mercury contamination in Hudson River fish, and explore local fish consumption as a topic of democratic debate and decision-making.

Dr. Stuart Belli, Vassar College
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Vassar College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Stuart was appointed as part of a team of Leadership Fellows from Vassar College, including Pinar Batur and Chris Smart, that worked to promote wider adoption of SENCER principles through workshops and support of regional activities. The team’s project centered around mercury contamination of Hudson River fish, and explored fish consumption by the local population as a topic of democratic debate and decision-making.

Since then, Stuart has partnered with a philosophy professor to teach an environmental science course on risk. The course features a module on mercury in which students use GoldSim, a Monte Carlo modeling system, to analyze the government’s guidelines on how much tuna is safe to eat per day. Stuart is also working with Chris and Pinar to create a course focused on neonicotinoids (a class of neuroactive insecticides) and honey bee decline. Another recent activity of Stuart’s has been designing a watershed website with local watershed awareness groups focused on community outreach.

Dr. Prabha Betne, LaGuardia Community College
Professor of Mathematics, LaGuardia Community College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2009

Prabha Betne

Prabha Betne has been a faculty leader and project director in LaGuardia’s Project Quantum Leap (PQL), an initiative supported by the U.S. Department of Educations FIPSE (Fund for Improvement of Postsecondary Education) grant from 2006-2009. The goal of the PQL program is to adopt the SENCER approach of teaching to high-risk, urban community college students in basic skills mathematics classes. Through the PQL Prabha leads faculty development workshops to develop curricula and instructional approaches for three math courses, Introduction to Algebra, Elementary Algebra, and College Algebra and Trigonometry, based on SENCER model. More than 25 faculty have been involved in the seminars and all of them are teaching their basic skills classes using SENCER approach. A website in the college contains several activities and lessons created through the seminars by the participating faculty, available for use by non-participating faculty.

As a Fellow, Prabha will expand these activities beyond her campus to the four-year institutions where La Guardia students transfer upon completing their Associate degree. She will continue to present the PQL team’s work and insight as the project persists and train 8-10 faculty each year to adopt SENCER. Support is available to help participating faculty publish their work in adopting the approach. She is currently preparing a complete curriculum for a math basic skills course that will be based on SENCER model, and plans to publish a paper on her own work with PQL and SENCER.

Dr. Mariah Birgen, Wartburg College
Professor of Mathematics and Director of the Scholars Program, Wartburg College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Mariah Birgen has been involved in the SENCER community extensively and has served as a member of the Summer Institute faculty. She has developed a calculus course, in which course content is learned through the complex, capacious civic questions it helps us to understand. She also participates in the activities of the SENCER Center for Innovation-Midwest and she has led a mini-course for the National Collegiate Honors Council national meeting on how to use SENCER ideals to teach honors science.

Dr. Paula Bobrowski, Auburn University
 

Dr. Gary Booth, Brigham Young University
Professor of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

As a SENCER Leadership Fellow, Gary has expanded his vital outreach activities as he continues to support the development of exceptional science courses, student research projects, and service learning initiatives at BYU. Gary also serves as a nodal leader for the newly formed Science and Civic Engagement Western Network (SCEWestNet), supported by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

Dr. Peter Bower, Barnard College
Senior Lecturer of Environmental Science, Barnard College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Peter Bower

Peter Bower, senior lecturer in environmental science at Barnard College, is the author of the SENCER model Brownfield Action. Peter and his colleagues at other colleges have revised the original model and presented on their progress to participants in the 2008 SENCER Summer Institute. Over the next 18 months, Peter will continue to reach out to new audiences, including high schools, to disseminate the model course. 

Dr. Arthur Bowman, Norfolk State University
Professor of Biology, Norfolk State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Art has continued his campus-based reform work at Norfolk State and will apply his talents to helping the SENCER program and its regional affiliates to extend the SENCER initiatives in a more organized and sustainable way with faculty leaders at HBCUs who are interested in applying SENCER ideals to the teaching of science. 

Dr. Margaret Brabant, Butler University
Professor of Political Science, Butler University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Margaret has focused her efforts on developing workshops for Butler faculty and others interested, exploring more effective ways of assessing the effectiveness of the new initiatives, and preparing a manuscript analyzing the SENCER approach and how it relates to her ten years’ experience working with service-learning pedagogy. Margaret is committed to sharing what they are learning at Butler with the SENCER community and others in the region and around the nation.

Dr. Vincent Breslin, Southern Connecticut State University
Professor of Science Education and Environmental Studies, Southern Connecticut State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

Vince BreslinVince and and his colleague Jim Tait, authors of the SENCER Model course Science on the Connecticut Coast: Investigations of an Urbanized Shoreline, plan to work together throughout their terms to continue to refine the course and to support the infusion of the SENCER ideals in all program offerings in the School of Arts and Sciences at SCSU. Topics of interest for possible new course developments include environmental modeling, environmental chemistry, and earth systems.

Dr. Sherryl Broverman, Duke University
Associate Professor of the Practice, Duke University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Sherryl will continue to coordinate Duke’s association with our STEM education reform project, support regional dissemination of SENCER ideals and programs, provide campus consultations, and help expand SENCER’s global programming. Sherryl has also authored a SENCER model course, AIDS Research: Global Understanding and Engagement.

Dr. Virginia Carson, Chapman University
Professor of Biological Sciences, Chapman University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Virginia CarsonAs a SENCER Leadership Fellow and member of the SENCER Center for Innovation Leadership Council, Virginia has helped to plan SENCER regional (California) dissemination and faculty development conferences and has expanded her course development work to include a focus on pharmacology and drugs.

Dr. Orianna Carter, Ohio University
Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, Ohio University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2010

Orianna CarterOrianna has been involved with SENCER for two years, and last year integrated a civic engagement activity into her first year majors biology course, focused on frogs and atrazine. This work will continue, and may expand to involve public school students and the local community. At the 2010 SENCER Summer Institute, Orianna presented results of this experience with a student from Ohio University. Next spring, she will present information about the biology course at Texas Woman’s University as part of their Civic Engagement Certificate program. During her fellowship, Orianna will also develop a multi-disciplinary course with the communications department, ‘Environmental Health Media Perceptions’. She will disseminate information about SENCER and her work during a brown bag luncheon series on campus, and possibly at monthly faculty meetings. She has also been invited to write an article on this first year experience.

Dr. Katayoun Chamany, Eugene Lang College
Associate Professor of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Eugene Lang College The New School
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Katayoun has expanded the SENCER course offerings at Eugene Lang College, focusing the SENCER community’s attention on issues involving stem cell research and policy, contributing to the backgrounder series and other dissemination activities, and exploring connections in global education. She is the author of the model course, Stem Cells and Social Justice.

Dr. Rao Chekuri, Woodbury University
Professor of Physics and Chair of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Woodbury University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Rao has been a leader Woodbury’s efforts to develop a model transdisciplinary studies program. His vision and energy have supported a broad adoption of SENCER ideals on campus. One focus of the Woodbury SENCER team has been on the complex set of issues involving traffic – a very promising new area of concentration for SENCER efforts. Rao will assist scholars who are interested in applying the SENCER ideals to pressing civic issues.

Dr. Steven Christenson, Brigham Young University-Idaho
Associate Professor of Biology, Brigham Young University-Idaho
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in August 2013

Steven ChristensonDr. Steven Christenson, associate professor of biology, has been involved with SENCER for several years. He has organized teams from BYU-Idaho, and is a member of the SCEWestNet Pioneer node. From 2007 to 2010, he served as the development team lead for a SENCER-aligned general education course focusing on DNA and issues in biotechnology. Steven coordinated two SENCER site visits to BYU-Idaho, including one in 2012 during which David Burns, Gary Booth, and Garon Smith served as a review panel for BYU-Idaho’s nascent science foundations program. The latter is an offering of interdisciplinary, issues-based courses designed to meet general science requirements.

During his fellowship, Steven hopes to have the opportunity for closer interaction with outstanding educators and innovators, and a greater opportunity to share SENCER ideals and resources both on and off my own campus. He plans to encourage colleagues to submit courses for consideration as SENCER Models. Steven will promote associations between SENCER and other organizations, including the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT). He will continue to ponder and revise his approach to teaching and curriculum design. These activities will include the development and implementation of SALG activities for his teaching team and the use of the data to inform and modify teaching practices. Findings and results will be shared at the BYU-Idaho annual faculty development workshop, and possibly at national NABT meetings.

Dr. Alan Christian, University of Massachusetts Boston
Director of the Environmental Science Program, University of Massachusetts Boston
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Alan ChristianAlan Christian, director of the environmental studies program at the University of Massachusetts Boston, became involved with SENCER during his time at Arkansas State University. At ASU, Alan worked on revisions of core courses for the environmental studies program to incorporate civic engagement and responsibility into the curricula. At UMass, Alan will share the SENCER approach with colleagues on campus and will reach out to build new partnerships with other organizations. Within the environmental studies program, he plans to develop several SENCERized courses, including a freshman sequence and a capstone course.

Dr. Peter Conrad, Plattsburgh SUNY
Professor and Chair of Biological Sciences, SUNY Plattsburgh
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Peter will be devoting considerable attention to the intersection of ethics and science, helping to establish a series of new courses that pursue study at this intersection, and helping colleagues – though consultations and writing projects – who want to use the civic challenges of science and ethics as vehicles for improving instruction and strengthening democratic institutions.

Dr. Maria Curtin, Stonehill College
Professor of Chemistry, Stonehill College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Maria CurtinMaria will develop strategies to engage and support other faculty members who wish to incorporate SENCER ideals in their courses. She will coordinate Stonehill’s partnership with the SENCER program and work to consolidate a set of courses, resources and activities that will enrich and further strengthen Stonehill’s academic program.

Dr. James Daly, Purchase College SUNY
Associate Professor of Biology, Purchase College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

With his colleague Jan Factor, Jim will participate in regional activities, offer consultations to others on design and implementation, coordinating Purchase’s assessment efforts with others with similar interests, and preparing materials on the Purchase College project for publication and potential use by other members of the SENCER community and those committed to improving STEM learning.

Dr. Monica Devanas, Rutgers University
Director of Faculty Development and Assessment Programs, Rutgers University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Monica DevanasMonica coordinates Rutgers’ involvement with the national project through her work as a co-director of the SENCER Center for Innovation – Midatlantic, by consulting with colleagues from other campuses who are interested in developing effective new STEM courses, and offering guidance to the national project as it develops new initiatives and strengthens existing programs.

Dr. Jacqueline Dewar, Loyola Marymount University
Professor Emerita of Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008 

Jackie DewarJackie has disseminated her innovative work in assessment, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and mathematics education to the broader SENCER network. With her colleagues (who are also Leadership Fellows) Suzanne Larson and Thomas Zachariah, Jackie has helped build alliances between SENCER and the national mathematics education community. Jackie, Suzanne, and Thomas led a workshop on civic engagement and quantitative literacy at last fall’s SCI-West regional meeting.

Jackie has expanded her work into the K-12 sphere by becoming involved in a math teacher leaders program that assists with Common Core implementation. She has coedited a book about doing the scholarship of teaching and learning aimed at mathematics. The book is set to be published by the Mathematical Association of America in early 2015, and will feature three chapters written by SENCER-related educators from Metropolitan State University and Oglethorpe University.

View Jackie’s professional webpage for updates on her current work and activities.

Dr. Helen Doss, Wilbur Wright College
Wilbur Wright College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

Helen DossHelen assembled an interdisciplinary team of faculty members who developed four courses for sequential deployment. In addition, she planned to create a workshop series to encourage discussion and adoption of the SENCER approach. A series of seminars on the SENCER approach was added to the tenure success and mentorship program at the college.

Dr. S. Monroe Duboise, University of Southern Maine
Associate Professor of Applied Medical Sciences, University of Southern Maine
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012

S. Monroe DuboiseMonroe has been involved with SENCER since 2003, when he and colleagues implemented a series of seminar courses on the human body for the USM Honors Program. Additional work has emphasized interactions with K-12 teachers and their students and has brought classroom molecular biology based studies of microbial and viral biodiversity into high school classrooms in rural Maine. Through NSF funding, an electron microscopy core facility has been established at USM for use both in research and in science education outreach projects for K-12 teachers and students. A NIH Science Education Partnership Award has allowed supported increased teacher professional development and science education outreach activities focusing on biodiversity, microbial and viral ecology,molecular biology, and ecological aspects of infectious diseases. Monroe and his colleagues have collaborated with faculty from the University of Nairobi investigating microbial extremophiles and their viruses in soda lakes of the Great Rift Valley. Currently the genomics aspects of this research has led to applications in vaccine and nanomedicine development which we will incorporate into our educational programs at USM and in teacher professional development and classroom outreach.

During his fellowship, Monroe will promote existing elements such as Saturday morning courses and lab workshops for K-12 teachers, some of which are connected with courses such as the infectious disease epidemiology course taken by bioscience and public health graduate students. Monroe will address the transformation process in bioscience education at the University of Southern Maine by working with colleagues to develop at least one new SENCER course on campus, possibly with emphasis on involving pre-service teachers as well as other science students. A major professional focus for Monroe is the success of a vaccine development project that involves synthetic biology directed toward nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. This research emphasis, combined with educational goals, has rich possibilities for engaging students and a team of colleagues in a new course built on SENCER principles that will go far in meeting the challenges put forth in the Vision and Change call to action.

Dr. Kriya Dunlap, University of Alaska Fairbanks
 

Dr. Richard Dunning, Normandale Community College
Instructor in Geology/Geography, Normandale Community College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012

Richard DunningRichard has undertaken a sabbatical project to develop student activities around Mississippi River related issues as a way to help students better engage in the class and in key local environmental issues. Over the previous decade he has developed and taught Environmental Geology, a course that relates the science of geology in relation to key environmental issues. Over the past four years, Rick has been the PI for an S-STEM scholarship program, work that has connected him to students from a wider range of scientific disciplines and has helped him appreciate some of the concerns they are dealing with.

As a Fellow, Rick proposes a Scientific Communication and Engagement in Civic Discourse, a project that explores how science is described, used, and misused in public media and in civic conversation. He plans to develop ways to use these portrayals of science and better understand the dynamics of the scientific method and the nature of scientific communication. If, collectively, we are interested in the engagement of science in civic responsibility, then the ways that science is communicated to the public and communicated about in public represent an important part of that engagemetn. Rick’s perspective is that we will have better scientists if we encourage science students to look closely at this public discourse about science and begin to think about their own work as scientists in the context of larger civic engagement.

Dr. Lawrence Duffy, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Larry has continued to disseminate SENCER ideals helping to create ‘Artic-focused’ SENCER courses and programs in and about the ‘Artic North’ – a critical and strategically important but often overlooked part of our globe. He is working to get SENCER ideals established within the UAF Honors Program and to disseminate SENCER to and encourage SENCER projects at the rural community colleges in Alaska. Larry is a nodal leader for the newly formed Science and Civic Engagement Western Network (SCEWestNet), supported by the W.M. Keck Foundation.

Dr. Juli Eflin, Ball State University
Professor of Philosophy, Ball State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Juli intends to write about and document the Ball State experience with the view to helping others involved in institutional reform. She will also help the SENCER community think about how to structure our efforts to both promote program sustainability.

Dr. Timothy Elgren, Hamilton College
Professor of Chemistry, Hamilton College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Tim wants to expand his SENCER-connected work by creating a stand-alone laboratory course at the intersection of chemistry, biology and earth science focused on environmental analysis. If this project is successful, Tim hopes to propose it as a national model. He also plans to forge new collaborations at Hamilton and with colleagues around the country who share similar goals for improving science learning and connecting that learning to important civic questions.

Dr. Karen Erickson, Southern New Hampshire University
Dean of Liberal Arts, Southern New Hampshire University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Karen plans to work with the SNHU team to expand the number of SENCER-inspired course offerings, coordinate institutional partnerships with SENCER, consult with others, and help the national program think about and design programs to, in Karen’s words, ‘educate to improve the human condition.’

Dr. Jan Factor, Purchase College SUNY
Professor of Biology, Purchase College

Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

With his colleague James Daly, Jan will participate in regional activities, offer consultations to others on design and implementation, coordinating Purchase’s assessment efforts with others with similar interests, and preparing materials on the Purchase College project for publication and potential use by other members of the SENCER community and those committed to improving STEM learning.

Dr. Marion Field Fass, Beloit College, retired
Professor and Chair of Biology and Chair of the Health and Society Program, Beloit College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Marion Field Fass

Marion sees her role as helping Beloit and sister institutions to develop courses that address public health issues in the community (demonstrating how a public health focus applies to learning cell and molecular biology) and to complete a manuscript that will make what she has learned available to colleagues in the US and abroad. She has served as co-director of the SENCER Center for Innovation-Midwest, which is now hosted at Beloit College. Marion was honored with the 2012 individual William E. Bennett Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Citizen Science for her efforts to improve STEM education.

Dr. Ellen Faszewski, Wheelock College
Associate Professor of Biology, Wheelock College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Ellen FaszewskiEllen is committed to developing new courses and curricula that embrace civic engagement, providing workshops and mentoring for colleagues, bringing SENCER ideals to pre-service elementary teacher education initiatives, and continuing her involvement with the network of colleagues that comprise the SENCER Center for Innovation – New England.

Dr. Pearl Fernandes, University of South Carolina Sumter
Associate Professor of Biology, University of South Carolina Sumter
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008 

Pearl FernandesPearl Fernandes is an associate professor of biology at the University of South Carolina Sumter who has long been associated with the SENCER project. She is an author of Life Science in Context: Subsaharan Africa & HIV/AIDS, a multiple institution collaboration, and serves on the Leadership Council for the SCI-South. As a Leadership Fellow, Pearl will continue to serve as a resource for faculty in the USC system, as well as colleagues at other institutions, and will specifically share information about the modules she has developed.

Dr. Kevin Finn, Merrimack College
Assistant Professor of Health Sciences and Sports Medicine, Merrimack College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2010

Kevin FinnThrough Kevin’s current Doctoral work in Curriculum and Teaching in the Physical and Health Education Program at Boston University, he has had the opportunity to explore, discover and research the field of education. As a SENCER Leadership Fellow, Kevin would like to work towards developing new guidelines for STEM courses in the School of Science and Engineering as well as connect real world issues to his courses. These guidelines would include using an interdisciplinary approach to the courses with an integration of fundamental scientific principles and a pedagogy that includes active learning, problem-solving and critical thinking components.

Dr. Alix Fink, Longwood University
Associate Professor of Biology and Interim Dean of the Honors College, Longwood University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2009

Alix FinkAlix has been involved with SENCER since 2002. After organizing the first team’s participation from Longwood, and then developed a course that has become the SENCER model, The Power of Water. In the spring semester (2010), The Power of Water will be offered for the eleventh time. In its own development, the POW effort has spawned other interdisciplinary projects.

As a Fellow, Alix plans to focus her efforts in three key areas: (1) she will work with colleagues to encourage and facilitate their involvement in SENCER courses. (2) Continue to develop the “LU at YNP” (Longwood University at Yellowstone National Park) program, a capstone course that integrates writing for citizenship, science education, and civics. At the core of our students experience is a one-week trip to Yellowstone National Park, where students are immersed in contentious issues of natural resource management. Students connect with stakeholders, and they try to balance their own enthusiasm for watching wolves in the park with the real issues faced by the people who live with the animals (as one example). That is when students realize that making decisions as informed citizens is about much more than understanding food web dynamics. (3) Extend SENCER efforts into other courses in Longwood’s teacher preparation program.

Dr. Cory Forbes, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Associate Professor 
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Dr. Forbes is interested in contributing to SENCER in ways that align with his current leadership, teaching, and research responsibilities at University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), as well as to SENCER’s broader mission. Through the UNL Science Literacy Initiative, which Dr. Forbes leads, UNL is uniquely positioned to build upon and institutionalize SENCER principles in programs that span undergraduate and K-12 education. For example, their team has received and is pursuing external funding for a new undergraduate minor on Food, Energy, and Water in Society and faculty development programs focused on problem-based science and effective STEM instruction.  Dr. Forbes and his colleagues have the opportunity to institutionalize and broaden impact of SENCER principles on campus through synergistic activities, and leverage these activities to develop a statewide and regional presence.

Dr. Marguerite Forest, Florida Gulf Coast University
Assistant Professor in Marine and Ecological Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

Marguerite ForestMarguerite Forest is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Marine and Ecological Sciences at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU). She and another newly elected Leadership Fellow, David Green, lead the FGCU SENCER team, which focuses on informal science education (ISE) and environmental education. Marguerite hopes that her Leadership Fellowship will increase support for her SENCER work by FGCU, federal and state agencies, and private foundations, and allow her work to be publicly recognized within the Gulf Coast, Everglades and Florida Keys region.

As a Leadership Fellow, Marguerite plans to encourage other faculty members in her department to design SENCER courses and to enhance her already extensive regional ISE involvement. Forest and her colleagues at FGCU are developing a southwest Florida counterpart to SENCER’s GLISTEN regional initiative and a SENCERized course track based upon Kapi’olani Community College’s model.

Dr. Robert Franco, Kapi'olani Community College
Director of the Office for Institutional Effectiveness, Kapi’olani Community College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Bob FrancoBob has led several teams to the SENCER Summer Institute and has helped to strengthen SENCER programs at community colleges, places that are critically important to the future of STEM education in the United States. He has also wrote a backgrounder on service learning and its application to science education.

Dr. DonnaJean Fredeen, Southern Connecticut State University
Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, Southern Connecticut State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

DonnaJean FredeenDonnaJean has focused her efforts on the development of innovative courses for first year students that emphasize science learning and civic engagement, completing her backgrounder on administrative strategies for implementing science reform initiatives, and providing consulting and mentoring to other academic leaders who desire to institute SENCER-connected programs on their campuses, including those who want to expand these new pedagogies and connections to civic engagement to courses in fields the social sciences, arts and humanities. DonnaJean is co-director for the SENCER Center for Innovation-New England, which is hosted by Southern Connecticut State University.

Dr. Steven Freeman, Iowa State University
Assistant Director for the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, Iowa State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Steve plans to help increase the involvement of engineers in the SENCER program, engage additional faculty members at ISU in connecting science education to civic challenges, conduct faculty development workshops and consultations, and support regional networks and activities.

Dr. Linda Fuselier, University of Louisville
University of Louisville
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012 

Linda FeselierLinda first learned of SENCER through a colleague while working on a project that centered around collaboration and women in science. She and her colleague used work from SENCER, particularly the report on the program’s effectiveness, to promote SENCER as a tool for increasing participation of underrepresented groups in STEM fields. Since then, she has attended a regional conference and organized a campus visit by Marion Field Fass to train faculty and administrators in the SENCER approach Linda has incorporated the basic ideas of SENCER courses into her classes with the intention of eventually converting a non-majors biology course fully.

As a Fellow, Linda facilitates a learning group including faculty from economics, biology, philosophy, physics, and gender studies in their grant-funded project to design SENCER-based course modules for biology and physics courses. The group has designed and implemented a SENCER course called Gender, Justice, and the Environment at Minnesota State University – Moorhead. The course combines physics, gender studies, and philosophy, and features a module on how Red River Valley floods impact women in the region, as well as a module on ultrasound.

Linda will be involved in developing an environmental science course and curriculum next year for which she will be working with faculty from institutions that do not use SENCER and have no experience with SENCER pedagogy. She plans to use this opportunity to engage with and mentor other faculty and to develop a SENCER course.Currently, Linda is busy working on the SENCER-ISE initiative.

Dr. Michael Gabel, George Mason University
Associate Professor of Integrative Studies and Mathematics, George Mason University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Randy will be exploring how helping students learn classical mathematics through enabling them to ‘teach’ this math to their peers can be a form of civic engagement that qualifies as practical and useful, in the SENCER tradition, not because it is tied to a specific contemporary civic question, but precisely because students can practice and use it.

Dr. Urmi Ghosh-Dastidar, New York City College of Technology
Associate Professor of Mathematics, New York City College of Technology
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2010

Urmi Ghosh-DastidarUrmi became involved with SENCER in 2009 through a team from New York City College of Technology and developed a SENCER model for a statistics course. As a Fellow, Urmi plans to continue building SENCER-based classroom modules for the statistics course. She will use part of her sabbatical period for building SENCER-based approaches for the next level statistics course. Topics will include Nosocomial infection in Brooklyn, childhood obesity and diabetes, and single parenthood and high school drops out. She will provide regional and national presentations (City Tech Math Club talks, RUTGERS University, SENCER summer institute 2011, the 2011 NCSCE Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session), build and implement classroom module, publish articles based on SENCER themes and promote student involvement for SENCER based teaching, learning, and civic engagement.

Dr. Ellen Goldey, Wofford College
Professor of Biology, Wofford College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Ellen Goldey

Ellen has worked to support the expansion of SENCER courses at Wofford and to assist peers, on a regional and national basis, in developing more effective assessment strategies designed to enhance achievement and deepen learning.

Dr. Barbara Gonzalez, Roosevelt University
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Roosevelt University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

 

Barbara GonzalezBarbara Gonzalez is an Associate Professor in Roosevelt University’s Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science. Barbara and Melanie Pivarski, a Roosevelt colleague and another newly elected Leadership Fellow, redesigned Calculus II as a SENCER course. They published an article, “The Real World Connection: Incorporating Semester-Long Projects into Calculus II,” about their course redesign in Science Education & Civic Engagement: An International Journal.

As a member of the Roosevelt University SENCER team, Barbara was a recipient of the 2012 William E. Bennett Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Citizen Science.

During her Fellowship, Barbara will continue to work closely with her colleagues and students at Roosevelt to develop additional SENCER courses. She is currently a member of NCSCE’s newest initiative, Engaging Mathematics, for which she is working with fellow Roosevelt professor Cathy Evins to couple an algebra course with Chicago’s social justice issues. Barbara is also mentoring a faculty member new to SENCER as she SENCERizes an actuarial science course about the mathematics behind financial topics such as interest, mortgages, and bonds. 

Dr. Richard Grallo, Metropolitan College of New York
Professor of Applied Psychology, Metropolitan College of New York
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

With his colleague Heide Hlawaty, Richard will be working to revise an MCNY earth science course along SENCER lines, expand SENCER projects in the area of graduate teacher education programs, and participate in regional activities, especially in the New York metropolitan area.

Dr. David Green, University of Miami
University of Miami
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

David GreenDavid Green is an Instructor in the Department of Marine and Ecological Sciences at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU). Supplementing his attendance and presentations at prior SENCER Summer Institutes, he currently leads the FGCU SENCER team with his colleague, Marguerite Forest. David recently published an article on the use of emerging technologies in science education in Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal.

As a Leadership Fellow, David plans to increase his involvement in the SENCER community, specifically within the South region; to enrich service-learning opportunities for FGCU students; and to mentor and develop relationships with new members of our community, including engineering faculty. Furthermore, he aspires to have one of his courses selected as a SENCER model, which others can use as a resource when designing their own courses.

Dr. Paul Grobstein (deceased)
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Paul GrobsteinPaul was the Eleanor A. Bliss professor of biology at Bryn Mawr College, where he co-founded the Serendip site. He helped develop a new SENCER courses at Bryn Mawr, formed new collaborations and consult with faculty at other institutions, and helped the SENCER national office design strategies to increase communication and disseminate resources that support significant change. Paul passed away in 2011.

Dr. Brian Hagenbuch, Hartwick College
Director of the Pine Lake Institute for Environmental and Sustainability Studies, Hartwick College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Brian HagenbuchBrian has focused on collaborating with members of the SENCER community interested in sustainability education and how to integrate the scientific and civic challenges and dimensions of sustainability into the college curriculum. He is interested in developing his own work at Hartwick into what can become a SENCER National Model and will continue to be engaged in mentoring and consultation regionally and with others interested in sustainability.

Dr. Sarah Haines, Towson University
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Towson University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Sarah HainesSarah has provided faculty development seminars at Towson, pursued the design and implementation of courses that would promote ocean literacy, and assisted the national office and others interested in developing new and robust SENCER projects focused on teacher education. She has integrated the SENCER approach into a course for pre-service teachers which was recently described in the publication “Pre-Service EdZoocation: Strengthening Teacher Education with Civic Engagement and Community Partnerships.” The course incorporates service-learning activities, and content focuses on biological concepts including living organisms in the environment.

Dr. Gary Halada, Stony Brook University
Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012

Gary HaladaGary and his colleagues from the four engineering departments have established an annual Socially Responsible Engineering Design Award as a result of their SENCER involvement. The award is presented each year to a student team from each program whose capstone design project and report best consider the potential impacts of their project on the community and society in general. In particular, the award has focused student attention and creativity on addressing and providing solutions to pressing problems in socio-economically disadvantaged communities in the US as well as globally. Gary and his colleagues have also developed an annual one day symposium on the “Ethical, Legal and Societal Impact of Nanotechnology,” an event that includes outside experts in areas from value sensitive design to bioethics.

As a Fellow, Gary will continue to advocate for the incorporation of values and ethics in undergraduate study and research in nanotechnology and other emerging technologies. He currently teaches a very popular ethics-related course (Learning from Engineering Disasters) to students from over 20 majors, as well as an enrichment course on how both reading and writing science fiction can help us understand the societal concerns which impact the development, use (or misuse) and regulation of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology and synthetic biology. Gary will further disseminate the educational models he has developed and their results in terms of how students can incorporate value-based decision making into their STEM learning. As co-P.I. on a project to evaluate electronic portfolios for enhancing engineering education and assessment, he plans to use the electronic portfolio model to continue building SENCER-related learning experiences into existing coursework. Also, as one of the leaders of a seven campus regional consortium focused on developing a new multi-institutional, multidisciplinary undergraduate program in energy education, the Leadership Fellow position will allow Gary to immediately incorporate and broaden the impact of SENCER-influenced coursework, not only through his efforts in curriculum development, but also through recruitment of faculty throughout the region.

Dr. Tim Haresign, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Associate Professor of Biology, Richard Stockton College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008Tim has worked to develop effective collaborations with the new and expanded pre-service teacher education program at Stockton, to continue with his regional consultative and mentoring activities, and to focus attention on effective assessment (both at the institutional level and in connection with the Consortium for the Assessment of Student Achievement, a group sponsored by SENCER and the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement).

Dr. Yvonne Harris, James Madison University
James Madison University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

As dean of mathematics and science at Harper College, Yvonne worked with the SENCER Center for Innovation-Midwest to instantiate the TEIP project in colleges in the Chicago area (including the possible development of a regional student leadership camp). She has continued her consultative work with colleagues around the country, and has connected colleagues engaged in science reform initiatives at Harper with SENCER with members of the SENCER community.

Dr. Heide Hlawaty, Metropolitan College of New York
Chair of General Education and Liberal Arts Programs, Metropolitan College of New York
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

With her colleague Richard Grallo, Heide will be working to revise an MCNY earth science course along SENCER lines, expand SENCER projects in the area of graduate teacher education programs, and participate in regional activities, especially in the New York metropolitan area.

Dr. Robert Holm, Auburn University
Assistant Director of Sponsored Programs Education, Auburn University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012

Bob HolmBob has been actively involved with SENCER since 2006. While at Butler University, he was a member of a team that received the Bennett award and was one of the founding co-directors of the SCI-Central Plains. He also taught SENCER-oriented courses in water quality and environmental biology and helped faculty design a number of SENCER-oriented courses.

Bob accepted his current position at Auburn University in 2012. He has introduced SENCER to his new colleagues, has coordinated SENCER workshops at the University’s annual Research Week Conference in 2013 and 2014 and has brought, and will bring, faculty teams to SSI 2013 and SSI 2014. Bob exchanges ideas with the regional SENCER Center for Innovation South located at UNC Asheville, as well as other fellows, allowing him to continue to bring the information gained from this cadre of experienced individuals to the Auburn campus.

Dr. Frank Hubacz, Franklin Pierce University
Professor of Chemistry, Franklin Pierce University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Frank HubaczWith his colleague Fred Rogers, Frank has offered consultation to colleagues at Franklin Pierce who wish to re-design their courses, worked to expand regional activities, and has pursued new collaborations (most notably with the Will Steger Foundation). They have brought greater attention to the SENCER approach at meetings of national organizations dedicated to improving science teaching.

Dr. Ben Hutchinson, Lipscomb University (deceased)
Professor of Chemistry, Lipscomb University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Ben supported faculty colleagues who are developing SENCER courses at all levels and worked to expand partnerships with other institutions in middle Tennessee to design science education projects focused on regional issues.

Ben passed away December 30, 2014. Please click here to read a remembrance of Ben written by Wm. David Burns.

Dr. Judith Iriarte-Gross, Middle Tennessee State University
Professor of Chemistry, Middle Tennessee State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Judith Iriarte-GrossJudith has developed course development efforts, provided consultation to faculty colleagues who want to develop innovative courses, worked to strengthen regional collaborations, and explored effective ways to encourage students to enroll in SENCER courses early in their college careers.

Dr. Trace Jordan, New York University
Associate Director of the Morse Academic Plan, New York University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Trace has focused his attention on a maturing set of questions related to assessing SENCER’s long term impact on learning. Working with colleagues who are similarly interested, he has developed, piloted, evaluated and reported on new assessment strategies.

Dr. Cynthia Kaus, Metropolitan State University
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Metropolitan State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Cindy KausAs a Leadership Fellow, Cindy has expanded SENCER work at Metropolitan State University (MSU), serves on the leadership council for the SENCER Center for Innovation-Midwest, and continues to engage adjunct faculty at MSU in innovations and reforms. On the national level, Cindy served as a Visiting Mathematician at the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement, during which time she developed strategies and carried out projects to increase the participation of mathematicians and mathematics educators in SENCER.

She currently serves as a Co-Principal Investigator for Engaging Mathematics, NCSCE’s newest initiative that applies the SENCER methodology to undergraduate mathematics education. She was recently appointed as a Fulbright Scholar in the Seychelles, where she introduced local faculty to the SENCER method of teaching. She plans on developing a course for the University of the Seychelles, as well as her home institution MSU, as part of the Engaging Mathematics initiative.

Dr. Amy Kelley, Mercersburg Academy
Mathematics, Mercersburg Academy
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

Amy Kelley teaches mathematics at Mercersburg Academy. Her SENCER involvement began when she was a faculty member at Georgia College and State University (GCSU) where she developed a math course taught in conjunction with an introductory science course. Several years ago, she and a GCSU colleague received a Post-Institute Implementation sub-award from NCSCE to develop a series of workshops on SENCER course design, which grew into the Innovative Course-building Group that remains active at GCSU (please click here for a recently published update on the group).

Presently, Amy is designing a course for Mercersburg students that will cover the art and mathematics concepts of 3D design and animation as well as the societal impacts of such hybrid creative-technical outlets for expression.

As a Leadership Fellow, she will serve as an ambassador to bring more high school teachers, including her Mercersburg colleagues, into the SENCER community. To achieve this goal, she intends to plan a Summer Institute specifically for those teachers and to organize a regional or national SENCER leadership group for high school teachers.

Dr. Joseph Kirsch, Butler University
Professor of Chemistry, Butler University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Joe has focused his attention on integrating civic engagement ideals and activities into Butler’s new general education program and to aligning and merging those new ideas with what Butler has been doing successfully up to now. He is committed to sharing what they are learning at Butler with the SENCER community and others in the region and around the nation.

Dr. Cynthia Klevickis, James Madison University
Professor of Integrated Science and Technology, James Madison University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

As a Fellow, Cindy has focused attention on designing strategies to encourage students to take science courses early in their academic careers and on bringing the cohort-based interventions she has designed to the attention of the wider STEM reform community through publications and dissemination at regional and national gatherings.

Col. Gerald Kobylski, United States Military Academy
Academy Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences, United States Military Academy
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012 

Jerry KobylskiJerry has become a leader in the SENCER community after coordinating team participation by the United States Military Academy (USMA) in the SENCER Summer Institute. For six years, he has directed a freshman calculus course at USMA that on average involves 1,000 students and 20 instructors per year. He is currently leading an interdisciplinary effort that which will include seven different courses in the fall of 2012 (and possibly an additional 10 in 2013), all of which will involve several thousand cadets. Jerry and his colleagues initiated a SALG based survey for nearly 14% of the entire student population to create a baseline.

He has already presented on these efforts and the team’s process at the Washington Symposium and Capitol Hill Poster Session and at a SCI-Midatlantic meeting in March 2012 at Monmouth University. In addition to leading the interdisciplinary effort, as a Fellow Jerry will continue to support regional efforts and consult with institutions or faculty interested in learning more about USMA’s work in interdisciplinary collaboration. 

Dr. Denise Eby Konan, University of Hawaii Manoa
Professor of Economics, University of Hawaii Manoa
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2009

Denise Eby Konan

Denise directs the Energy and Greenhouse Gas Solutions (EGGS) project, which analyzes and tailors energy and climate change policy by assessing technology options and the associated environmental and economic impacts. Detailed data on Hawaii’s economy, energy infrastructure, and environment are the base for computable general equilibrium models of business as usual and alternative carbon reduction policies. Technological solutions, such as bioenergy and sea water air conditioning, are among the systems that are analyzed. Denise and Leadership Fellow Mary Tiles designed a new interdisciplinary course that integrates scientific knowledge, economic analysis, and ethical principles in the study of global climate change. Ten top scientists from Oceanography, Geology, and Atmospheric Science were invited to present and advise the class. Student teams integrate this knowledge to devise policy solutions to climate change. Results are presented in a white paper, a policy brief, press release, and a governors speech. Five students from that class are currently conducting undergraduate research under her direction in a sustainability internship experience.

As a SENCER leadership fellow, Denise will work to promote undergraduate research and education by developing curriculum that links scientific inquiry to economic reasoning and engaging students in consequential scientific issues facing our communities. She will develop a vibrant undergraduate student internship program that provides financial support for students to conduct research under the direction of University of Hawaii faculty in science and economics. Beginning with undergraduate and graduate education, she will plan outreach activities that would strengthen Hawaii’s K-12 curriculum and awareness in local business and the public sector. The SENCER affiliation will also support efforts to build a network of University of Hawaii faculty from Economics, Oceanography, Geology, Philosophy, and Engineering that will support student engagement in scientific inquiry around societal problems. Programs at the University of Hawaii will inform public decision making over the economics and environmental consequences of Hawaii energy policy, greenhouse gas emissions reduction, and other relevant legislative initiatives.

Dr. Joseph Koonce, Case Western Reserve University
Professor Emeritus of Biology, Case Western Reserve University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

Joe Koonce

Joseph Koonce is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biology at Case Western Reserve University. After Case Western colleagues introduced Joseph to the SENCER approach, he incorporated civic engagement into his established inquiry-based courses. Under Joe’s leadership, Case Western was part of the Cleveland-Akron cluster of NCSCE’s GLISTEN initiative.

Joe will serve as director of the new SENCER Center for Innovation for the Great Lakes region (SCI-Great Lakes), which will continue GLISTEN’s work and encourage formal and informal education venues throughout the region to include civic engagement in K-16 course and project design. Joe’s work as a Leadership Fellow will primarily focus on the launch of SCI-Great Lakes and his continued leadership at Case Western.

Dr. Erica Kosal, North Carolina Wesleyan College
Associate Professor of Biology, North Carolina Wesleyan College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Erica plans to pursue this inquiry into the student motivation, to disseminate SENCER ideals on campus (with special attention to forming collaborations with teacher educators), and to expand her collaborations with colleagues at other institutions. She expects that these collaborations will lead to the development of new intercollegiate, transdisciplinary courses, like the one she helped develop with colleagues at Meredith College and USC-Sumter.

Dr. Rita Kranidis, Montgomery College
Professor of English and Director, Global Humanities Institute
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Rita Kranidis has extensive experience with faculty development programming and training curricula, as well as with supporting curriculum change such as general education revision, general education course certification, and syllabus revision. She has taught at Montgomery College since 2000 and has held a number of professional roles, including chair of the English Department, credit English program coordinator, and as Women’s Studies Campus Coordinator. She also created and led the Writing in the Disciplines Collegewide program at Montgomery, which won a national “Exemplary Program” award by the National Council for Teachers of English’s Two Year College Association. Her focus is on interdisciplinary studies and globalized curricula. As a Fellow, Rita will initiate SENCER workshops at Montgomery College, offer information sessions, and share model syllabi with colleagues. She will bring SENCER principles to her College’s new Integrative Studies program and will research collaborations between STEM and the humanities with a global focus. 

Dr. Keith Krumpe, University of North Carolina at Asheville
Dean of Natural Sciences and Professor of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Asheville
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Keith KrumpeKeith co-directs the SENCER Center for Innovation-South, serves as a senior associate, and is a leader in SENCER’s efforts to apply what we have discovered about how to improve learning in courses for those majoring in the science disciplines. He helps us focus on broad curricular reform in general, and reforming pre-medical preparation, in particular.

Dr. David Kumar, Florida Atlantic University
Professor of Science Education
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Dr. Kumar’s research and scholarly activities focus on improving science teaching and learning with technology, science literacy, and evaluation and policy. With findings from Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, he developed web-based Problem Based Learning units in nanotechnology involving learning science through informed consumer decision-making and analyzing health and societal issues of nanomaterial use in day-to- day products. Studies showed significant gains in conceptual understanding, attitude towards science and applying science to solve science related societal topics. Dr. Kumar also mentors undergraduate pre-service education majors to visit local classrooms promoting engaging counterintuitive science lessons. In partnership with the Fort Lauderdale Museum of Discovery and Science, he has developed a project where undergraduate science education students develop lesson plans based on current exhibits and present their lessons to members of the general public. As a Fellow, Dr. Kumar plans to promote civic science engagement through informal science education in local K-12 schools, integrate SENCER themes in pre-service teacher education, present seminars on SENCER for local parents and in-service teachers, and publish research papers in journals. 

Dr. Matthew Laposata, Kennesaw State University
Associate Professor of Environmental Science, Kennesaw State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Matthew Laposata

Matthew Laposata is an associate professor of environmental science at Kennesaw State University who has been involved with SENCER since the first Institutes. In the past several years, Matthew has had extensive experience with the granting process from all sides – as a reviewer, an administrator, and a writer. As a Fellow, Matthew plans to leverage his expertise in preparing federal and private grant proposals for teaching and learning projects to help members of the SENCER community be more successful in gaining support for their programs. He will pilot this program within his regional area, and will expand to all areas at a later date.

Dr. Suzanne Larson, Loyola Marymount University
Professor of Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Suzanne LarsonSuzanne has expanded her work to focus on applying SENCER ideals to courses for more mathematically-sophisticated students. With her colleagues (and Leadership Fellows) Jackie Dewar and Thomas Zachariah, Suzanne has assisted the SENCER program to build alliances with the national mathematics education community.

Dr. Dennis Lehman, Harold Washington College, retired
Co-Director, SENCER Center for Innovation-Midwest
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Denis Lehman

Ms. Flora Lichtman
Multimedia Editor, Science Friday
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

Flora Lichtman

Flora Lichtman is a multimedia editor for National Public Radio’s Science Friday.� Through Science Friday, Flora educates listeners and online viewers by presenting scientific research in a way that is both entertaining and understandable for experts and non-experts alike.

In addition to Flora’s radio and video production work, she regularly speaks on science and science journalism before a variety of audiences, including providing engaging plenary and keynote addresses for the NCSCE community at the 2010, 2011, and 2012 Washington Symposia and Capitol Hill Poster Sessions.

“Whale Fall,” an animated short film developed by Flora and filmmaker Sharon Shattuck about whales falling to the bottom of the ocean, was honored with several awards and has had nearly one million views online. She hopes to produce another science-themed short film in 2013.

As a Leadership Fellow, Flora will aim to forge a deeper connection between the SENCER, informal science education, and science journalism communities.

Dr. Joseph Liddicoat, New York University
Adjunct Professor of Science, New York University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Joe will be helping to organize regional meetings to disseminate SENCER curricular models and pedagogical practices, and he will help coordinate the development of additional SENCER offerings at NYU and collaborating institutions.

Dr. Jon Lyon, Merrimack College
Associate Professor of Biology, Merrimack College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Jonathan LyonJonathan Lyon is an associate professor of biology at Merrimack College where he has been involved in SENCER activities with colleagues on campus and has organized his courses for both STEM majors and students majoring in other disciplines around ecological issues. As a fellow, Jonathan will continue to share his experience with colleagues on campus and assist other educators adopting SENCER principles in their courses, especially those that are part of the new major and minor in environmental studies/sustainability. He also anticipates developing collaborations with community organizations to expand student opportunities to address watersheds and sustainability.

Dr. Cynthia Maguire, Texas Woman's University
Senior Lecturer in Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Woman’s University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012

Cynthia Maguire

Cynthia has been involved with SENCER since 2008, both individually and as a part of the Texas Woman’s University (TWU) team. Her scholarship of teaching and learning research has focused on increasing success in a below-college-level science course. Cynthia has also made great strides in the development and piloting of a dual poster project at TWU to increase student understanding of the civic consequences of their work. This project requires students to create a public version of their research posters that so that an educated, but not expert in the field, is able to easily understand the implications of the research and work.

As a Fellow, Cynthia plans to organize at least one SCI-Southwest workshop annually on various topics of interest. She will also further decelop the dual poster concept and attended an International Institute for SoTL Scholars and Mentors (IISSAM) workshop for that purpose in May. The dual poster pilot study results have indicated students who develop a public version of their technical poster are significantly more capable of understanding and communicating the importance of their work. Cynthia has been heavily involved in TWU’s Science, Society, and Sustainability certificate program, teaching both the foundation and capstone courses. The program is designed to teach sustainability issues from many perspectives and culminates in a civic project to improve the sustainability of the local community. It is her intention to continue this work and build a strong interdisciplinary program within the College of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Phil Mason, Coastal Georgia
Vice President of Academic Affairs, College of Coastal Georgia
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

At the College of Coastal Georgia, Phil serves as vice president of academic affairs, where he continues his work as a Fellow. Phil supported new course development at Fairmont State University, where he served as vice president for research and graduate studies. He offered consultations to colleagues from other campuses in the region, and advised the national program on ways to strengthen and make more durable the reforms that have already begun.

Dr. Autumn Marshall, Lipscomb University
Associate Professor of Nutrition, Lipscomb University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2010

Autumn Marshall

Autumn has been involved with SENCER for several years through participation on teams at Lipscomb University and specifically in her specialty of dietetics. She would like to see greater applications of SENCER to health sciences education at Lipscomb and also nationwide. As a Fellow, Autumn will disseminate information about SENCER to the American Dietetic Association, her disciplinary association. She will also collaborate with colleagues on campus from the natural sciences and the Lipscomb service learning initiatives to continue to integrate SENCER into the curriculum and student experiences.

Dr. Woody McKenzie, Lynchburg College
Associate Professor and Program Director for M.Ed. in Science, Lynchburg College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Woody has worked with colleagues to expand interdisciplinary offerings at Lynchburg, explore the use of environmental issues as themes for his own courses, and disseminate SENCER ideals and programs to science educators, including public school teachers, in his part of Virginia.

Dr. John Mecham, Meredith College
Professor of Biological Sciences, Meredith College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

John has received NSF support for a multi institutional collaboration that globalizes science learning by focusing on contemporary public health and civic challenges in Africa. As a Fellow, John supports SENCER’s efforts to expand global partnerships, enhances teacher education programs, and supports reforms on the Meredith campus and in the region.

Dr. Julia Metzker, Georgia College & State University
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Georgia College & State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

As a Fellow, Julia focuses on forging collaborations to design compelling interdisciplinary courses to meet new core curriculum standards in Georgia, and she coordinating SENCER dissemination activities at Georgia College & State University.

Dr. George Middendorf, Howard University
Professor of Biology, Howard University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in August 2013

George MiddendorfDr. Middendorf first became involved with SENCER about a decade ago, and since then has implemented the SENCER approach in the development of four interdisciplinary courses. Science and Public Policy was the first team-taught, interdisciplinary course at Howard. The other three courses are Environmental Studies III; Katrina, an interdisciplinary examination of an unnatural disaster; and Food, an interdisciplinary examination of the relationships of biology, history and sociology. Each course utilized concepts promulgated by SENCER, e.g. inclusion of components connecting course topics to issues of critical local, national, and global importance. Environmental Studiesintertwines a traditional ES approach with consideration of environmental justice issues. The Katrina course uses a multi-disciplinary approach to understand the causes and impacts of Hurricane Katrina on the New Orleans region and peoples. The Foodcourse examines the historical role of foods and spices on exploration and colonization, the biology of food preparation and food safety, and the sociology of consumption and self-image. In recognition of his efforts, he received the university Inspirational Interdisciplinary Project Award.

In addition to the interests mentioned above, Dr. Middendorf is also involved in two other activities that lend themselves to and would benefit from SENCER interaction. He is leading the examination and updating of the biology curriculum, a major component of which involves consideration of development of interdisciplinary courses with chemistry, engineering, psychology, etc.� Secondly, collaborators in a number of other disciplines are engaged in developing an ethical model to facilitate research university involvement in sustainable development. Both provide interesting opportunities for the development and implementation of new, SENCER-focused courses at Howard, e.g. implementation of an interdisciplinary component to the biology curriculum and development of either new courses or modification of existing courses that include a SENCER component linking courses and course topics to critical local, national, and global issues. He also plans to address the lack of interdisciplinary, undergraduate directed texts on the intersection of science and public policy.

Dr. Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan, Texas Woman's University
Assistant Professor
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

As a scientist and a faculty member, Dr. Nasrin Mirasaleh-Kohan focuses on developing social responsibility in students. As part of the SCI-Southwest team and now Co-Director for SCI-Southwest, she has introduced other campuses to SENCER via workshops and consultations. Dr. Mirasaleh-Kohan is an advisor for the Kappa Epsilon Mu club, the American Chemical Society student affiliate organization. She has included activities in her physics classes to inspire students to connect to their world around them and has taught them about the role they play in their communities and overall in the world. She participated in the pilot study of Enduring Understandings using the SALG instrument in spring 2016.

As a Fellow, Dr. Mirasaleh-Kohan will continue to organize SCI-SW regional symposia at TWU, and will specifically market the meetings to faculty and institutions who have not yet been involved. She will also participate in house call visits to other institutions, during which she will present workshops on the benefits of SENCER courses to students’ learning, and how faculty can SENCERize a course.  She will also support new faculty at TWU and within the SCI-SW network to implement SENCER in their courses. She plans to expand SENCER activities in her physics classes and redesign physics laboratories.

Dr. Karobi Moitra, Trinity Washington University
Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor, Biology
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Dr. Karobi Moitra has received the Fellows Award for Research Excellence from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for her research that is centered on the role of ABC transporters in human disease and drug resistance. She has presented workshops on her pedagogy of storytelling in the classroom, podcasting and bioinformatics. Students in her classes do a photovoice project on community engagement involving addiction and disease. In a genome annotation project, students can discover new genes. This project can easily be applied to high school students and the general public as a community based project. She has also organized student symposia and poster sessions on pandemics and globalization and on GMO’s and gene patenting, and mentored students on projects based on sustainability, such as ‘Reduce, Reuse and Recycle,’ through which students designed and implemented recycling projects in the community. As a Fellow, Karobi would like to develop course modules, host group and individual workshops, mentor faculty, and create an online resource page with training modules. She plans to develop course materials in conjunction with other faculty and actively engage in promoting these materials across disciplines, institutions, and disciplinary communities. 

Dr. David Morimoto, Lesley University
Division Director for Natural Science and Mathematics, Lesley University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

David plans to expand civic engagement activities as a substantive component in a wide variety of courses, provide faculty development opportunities for colleagues (at Lesley and other colleges in the region) on the SENCER ideals and pedagogies, and develop longer term community-focused research activities that will serve to improve student learning and produce knowledge of use to the local community and the larger region, as well.

Dr. Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Harold Washington College
Assistant Professor of Biology, Harold Washington College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2012

Farahnaz MovahedzadehFarah has been an active participant in the SENCER community for several years, and has presented the results of her work through poster presentations and journal articles. As a Fellow, Farah will continue to promote SENCER principles in her classes, department, and the college at large through presentations and by encouraging SENCER curriculum and activities. She is planning not only to expand the existing projects that her students are currently working on, but also to start new ones including the use of Project-Based-Learning to promote SENCER principles and students engagement. Farah intends to collaborate with faculty from the biology department and other departments in this regards. She will also connect with other Chicago-based Fellows to collaborate with them in SENCER projects that will benefit regional activities and growth.

Farah plans to continue to develop and publish about strategies that promote student involvements in SENCER courses early in their academic careers (especially among women and minority students). She will continue in conducting scholarly research and publish the learning activities and teaching strategies that promote SENCER principles in and out-side the classrooms. She will continue to encourage her students to come up with creative ideas and alternative strategies and solutions for SENCER activities that help them not only to learn, but also to present and publish their work.

Mr. Glenn C. Odenbrett, Case Western Reserve University
 

Dr. Wyatt Oswald, Emerson College
Associate Professor, Emerson College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

Wyatt OswaldWyatt Oswald is an Associate Professor in the Science Program of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Emerson College. Following Wyatt’s attendance at the 2007 SENCER Summer Institute, he led an revision of Emerson’s science curriculum. The curriculum now has two SENCERized clusters of courses:Human Health and Biology and Environmental Science.

Wyatt and his students are developing three websites that could be of use to his SENCER colleagues: an online library of science mini-magazines; the Digital Arboretum of Boston Common, a collection of short films and podcasts about the vegetation of Boston’s iconic public landscape that can be used to teach biology or ecology; and an online science radio program primarily written and recorded by Emerson students.

As a Leadership Fellow, Wyatt hopes to offer advice to SENCER colleagues reforming their institutions’ curricula. He also plans to write a comparative article about the updated Emerson curriculum and curricula at other arts and communications-focused institutions.

Dr. Melanie Pivarski, Roosevelt University
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Roosevelt University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2012

Melanie Pivarski

Melanie Pivarski is an Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Roosevelt University. Shortly after Melanie’s arrival at Roosevelt, she and Barbara Gonzalez redesignedCalculus II as a SENCER course. They published an article, “The Real World Connection: Incorporating Semester-Long Projects into Calculus II,” about their course redesign in Science Education & Civic Engagement: An International Journal.

As a member of the Roosevelt University SENCER team, Melanie was a recipient of the 2012 William E. Bennett Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Citizen Science. Melanie regularly presents her SENCER work at academic conferences and is involved with national mathematics organizations, and through these interactions hopes to increase connections between the SENCER and mathematics communities.

Currently, Melanie is conducting a quantitative study interviewing her Calculus IIstudents who served as embedded tutors and researched course designs. She hopes to finish a draft of the study by the 2014 SENCER Summer Institute to get feedback from event attendees, and then submit the paper this summer to the Mathematical Association of America.

Dr. Lisa Pike, Francis Marion University
Associate Professor of Biology, Francis Marion University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Lisa will be expanding her SENCER work with a focus on pre-service teacher education and applying new pedagogical approaches to the “Environment in Context” initiatives in South Carolina.”

Dr. John Pratte, Arkansas State University
Associate Dean for Research and External Engagement and Professor of Physics, Arkansas State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

John PratteJohn has worked to expand the scope of SENCER course offerings at ASU, provide consultations to other faculty within the region, and focus his attention on assessment activities, with the university and as part of a national consortium supported by SENCER.

Dr. Pamela Proulx-Curry, University of Maine at Augusta
Bangor Campus Dean, University of Main at Augusta
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

 

Pamela Proulx-CurryPamela Proulx-Curry is the Bangor Campus dean at the University of Maine at Augusta. She was previously the dean of academic affairs at Eastern Maine Community College, and executive director of the Wisconsin Campus Compact (WiCC). Pamela has extensive experience in STEM education, K-16 partnerships, and professional development for educators. During her fellowship she has incorporated a SENCER track into an annual statewide service-learning and civic engagement conference and contributed her expertise to both the SCIs and the national program.

Dr. Frederick Rogers, Franklin Pierce University
Chair of Natural Sciences and Associate Professor of Geology, Franklin Pierce University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

With his colleague Frank Hubacz, Fred has offered consultation to colleagues at Franklin Pierce who wish to re-design their courses, worked to expand regional activities, and has pursued new collaborations (most notably with the Will Steger Foundation). They have brought greater attention to the SENCER approach at meetings of national organizations dedicated to improving science teaching.

Dr. David Rosen, O'More College of Design
O’More College of Design
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2009

David RosenDavid led the strategic planning initiative that led to the founding of the Institute of Transdisciplinary Studies and of SENCER activities as the central mechanism for cross-disciplinary collaboration inside and outside the classroom. His office [Senior Vice President] has supported teams to attend the SENCER conferences, has helped sponsor on campus and off-campus workshops, including participation in the Lily-West Conference and an upcoming regional SENCER meeting. Recently, he helped to author a HUD grant for Woodbury’s Arid Lands Institute, which uses the SENCER model for education that draws together the fields of architecture, science, and the humanities.

As a Leadership Fellow, David will reach out to other leaders on campus to broaden and deepen the use of the SENCER approach as a model of learning on campus. Specifically, he will set up on-campus workshops to encourage SENCER as a model for teaching and learning that has a strong problem-based and experiential component and that allows students to develop tools for collaborative problem solving that draws on and respects the contribution of multiple disciplines. In particular, he will work to make the contribution of the STEM disciplines important to all students, regardless of discipline and to both appreciate their general education and make that appreciation grow into a commitment to lifelong learning that gives important to knowledge of the STEM discipline in both their professional and personal lives. He will encourage and support deans, chairs, and faculty to carry their knowledge to conferences in their disciplines and to share the paradigm through professional development activities, including publications that report on college programs and learning achievements.

Anna Rozenboym, Kingsborough Community College
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Anna Rozenboym teaches Human Anatomy and Physiology courses geared towards students aspiring to enter allied health fields. Her educational background is in psychology and neuroscience with experience in both basic science and applied translational research. At this time in her career, she is focused on researching innovative pedagogy practices, student learning, engagement and motivation. Through incorporating civic engagement into science curricula, she hopes to make material learned in class relevant and useful to students with a goal to equip and empower them to become educated consumers of the healthcare industry as well as compassionate and expert health care providers. As a Fellow, Anna will collaborate on regional events and other conferences, including the initiation of efforts to organize a campus-wide SENCER event centered on theory and practical examples of the approach. She will familiarize faculty in her department and across campus with her findings and experience conducting research, guide colleagues in applying the SENCER approach, and continue curricular redesign for additional courses. 

Dr. David Rutschman, Northeastern Illinois University
Professor of Mathematics and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Northeastern Illinois University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

David RutschmanAs a Fellow, David will continue to lead efforts to incorporate civic engagement into STEM courses, particularly for the core courses in the now approved Environmental Science major at Northeastern Illinois University, and for both general education and lower-level science courses. The first majors course for Environmental Science will be offered at Northeastern Illinois University this spring. David has also helped transform the University’s core curriculum to become more centered around civic engagement.

Mr. Christopher Sabino, Harold Washington College
Instructor of Mathematics, Harold Washington College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

Chris will concentrate on applying the SENCER approach to developmental education at the College, and eventually, to K-12 education. He will continue to work with colleagues also serving as Fellows as well as new faculty on both interdisciplinary and mathematics-specific initiatives.

Dr. Rob Sanford, University of Southern Maine
Professor and Chair of Environmental Science and Policy, University of Southern Maine
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2010.

Rob Sanford

Rob serves as co-director for the SENCER Center for Innovation-New England, and in this capacity helps disseminate and support SENCER initiatives across the country and especially in New England. He also advises the national office on programming and sustainability.

Dr. Herbert Schanker, CUNY at the College of Staten Island
Associate Professor, Computer Science
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Herbert Schanker received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering and was licensed in New York as a professional engineer. Herb’s areas of expertise are computer science, data communications and digital systems. He has been affiliated with ITT, European American Bank, Stony Brook University, New York Medical College, and Sequential Information Systems. At the College of Staten Island, he has taught all levels of computer science, engineering and technology subjects where he developed original courses in computers and data communications. Through his involvement with SENCER, he and his colleagues have improved learning and assessment and increased interest in computer science study. He has previously served as the computer science’s department representative to the college-wide General Education Committee, where he has strongly promoted the importance of technology study for all majors. 

Dr. Sandra Seidel, University of Virginia
Assistant Dean and Associate Professor of Biology, University of Virginia
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Sandy has introduced the SENCER program to colleagues at the University of Virginia (UVA), engaged with the SENCER regional center for innovation, and developed a new course for UVA based on SENCER principles. Sandy believes that her renewed association with SENCER can be beneficial to the University as it implements the strategic initiatives of the Commission on the Future of the University, particularly those goals of connecting academic life to public service through service learning and community-based research.

Dr. Robert Seiser, Roosevelt University
Associate Professor of Biology and Chemistry, Roosevelt University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Bob Seiser

Bob has worked for the wider adoption of SENCER courses, the development of new curricular materials and resources, and has supported regional collaborations (especially those promoting articulation with two-year colleges). Bob is part of a team of faculty from Roosevelt that were recognized with the 2012 team William E. Bennett Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Citizen Science.

Bob is a Co-Director for SCI-Midwest.

Dr. Richard Sheardy, Texas Woman's University
Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Physics, Texas Woman’s University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Dick has collaborated with colleagues to develop a new partnership with the local school district to involve students in learning and civic engagement and has served as a consultant to faculty who want to apply SENCER ideals in non-science disciplines, including the arts and business. Dick is the co-director of the SENCER Center for Innovation-Southwest, hosted by Texas Woman’s University. He also served as the editor for the book, Science Education and Civic Engagement: The SENCER Approach.

Dr. R. Drew Sieg, Young Harris College
Assistant Professor of Biology
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Dr. Sieg first became involved with SENCER while at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU), where he was involved in the Experiential Learning program and received small grants to incorporate service-based models into honors biology courses. While there, he restructured three lower-division honors biology courses and built two additional upper division courses. Dr. Sieg is a partner instructor in the “Small World Initiative,” an inquiry-based lab redesign for introductory biology focused on antibiotic discovery. For Small World, he serves on both the science and publication committees for this program. Last year, Dr. Sieg was one of two instructors to pilot the Small World model in a high school setting (through a dual-enrollment course at MTSU). At Young Harris College, one of his first goals is to transform the current biology courses for non-majors into a thematic STEM-STEAM course focused on surrounding Chattahoochee National Forest. Students will explore topics expected of a non-majors survey course, but will do so entirely through the lens of organisms that reside in the Chattahoochee. Dr. Sieg will create a highly fluid, active classroom with a field-based laboratory using problem-based learning to develop students’ critical thinking skills.

Dr. Gail Simmons, Hofstra University
Hofstra University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Gail uses her considerable communications skills and gifts of persuasion to promulgate SENCER reforms at sister institutions and through research and writing projects assessing the impact of SENCER on professional practice and teaching. In her previous position at the College of Staten Island, Gail supported faculty participation in SENCER and the development of many courses and projects in the nursing and computer science departments.

Dr. Christopher Smart, Vassar College
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Vassar College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Dr. Smart is part of a team of Vassar Leadership Fellows who has worked to promote wider adoption of SENCER principles, though workshops and support of regional activities. They also plan to fully develop and launch the mercury project focusing on mercury contamination in Hudson River fish and local fish consumption as a topic of democratic debate and decision-making.

Dr. Garon Smith, University of Montana, retired
Professor of Chemistry, University of Montana
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Garon is a deeply serious educational innovator who is committed to reducing the alarming attrition of good students from science courses. As a Leadership Fellow, Garon has helped to connect SENCER to the National Conferences of Undergraduate Research (NCUR) program, whose national meeting he chaired in 2010. At the meeting, Garon introduced a program that offered students a chance to create a second version of their research posters that translated the implications of the research into non-scientific language.

Dr. Davida Smyth, Mercy College
Associate Professor, Natural Sciences
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Davida Smyth has been the program coordinator for the Biomedical Informatics Program at New York City College of Technology and is currently an instructor of Bioinformatics at NYU Tandon School of Engineering. She is also the co-coordinator of READ—Reading Effectively Across the Disciplines—an initiative aimed at improving biology students’ reading skills through instruction in reading, faculty development, and peer led team learning. Davida has published extensively in the field of microbial epidemiology and has more than 20 original articles in peer-reviewed journals, and a book chapter. She is a member of the editorial board of BMC Infectious Diseases journal. She received her bachelor’s and PhD, both in microbiology, at the University of Dublin Trinity College in Ireland and her postdoctoral training at New York Medical College, the University of Mississippi Medical Centre, and New York University, where she maintains assistant research scientist status in the Skirball Institute of NYU Langone Medical Center. Her research focuses on the role of mobile DNA, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance in clinical and environmental strains of Staphylococci.

During her fellowship, Davida will integrate the SENCER ideals into introductory biology lecture courses by linking the course material to the global problem of sustainability in terms of food, water, climate and energy. She is devoted to undergraduate research. Since 2012, she has established new research projects in microbial ecology with her undergraduate student researchers. She studies the microbiome of the college campus and organism diversity of water sites in Brooklyn. She also plans to develop a SENCER model course focused on antibiotic resistance in Staphylococci and the role of human activities in driving it. 

Dr. Jim Speer, Indiana State University
Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Systems, Indiana State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2010

Jim SpeerJim has been leading the SENCER Team at Indiana State University, which have been supported through ISU’s strategic plan. He has already converted four of the courses that he teaches using the SENCER approach, have held faculty development workshops in which 50 of our faculty have participates, held a regional SENCER conference, and is making plans to follow up with the local universities that attended this conference and want to learn more about the SENCER teaching model. With the ISU SENCER Student Leadership Team, he has started writing a backgrounder and is working on a peer-reviewed publication of SENCER at ISU and the student leadership teams role in that program. Their current project is to develop a complete sustainability minor that uses the SENCER Teaching Model. In three years, there will be another round of courses accepted into Foundational Studies and ideally, most of those will be SENCER courses.

Jim and the SENCER Student Leadership Team received the team William E. Bennett Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Citizen Science in recognition of their efforts on campus.

Dr. Joseph Staples, University of Southern Maine
Lecturer in Environmental Science
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Over the past two years, Dr. Staples has been working with students and faculty in Environmental Science and Policy at the University of Southern Maine and individuals from the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) along with the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation and multiple universities, to install wireless environmental sensors in a roughly nine acre hemlock forest located on the Gorham campus. This forest site offers an extraordinary example of old hemlocks that have deposited needles for more than 100 years resulting in an open forest floor that offers a glimpse of what Maine forests may have looked like hundreds of years ago.  The forest is currently used by several classes in ESP, independent projects by ESP students, USM athletes, and nature lovers from campus and the local community. Using a combination of commercial and build-your-own sensors, Dr. Staples plans to continuously monitor and record environmental conditions at the site and teach others how to deploy sensors at their own sites.  The environmental and ecological data will be made available online so that it can be used for education and research by individuals at USM and elsewhere. The methods being developed in this work can used by a range educational institutions, NGOs, and citizen-science based projects. 

Dr. Gale Starich, Brenau University
Dean, Brenau University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

A leader in women’s education, Gale Starich has worked to instantiate SENCER principles and ideals in the curriculum at Brenau University. She is particularly interested in fostering efforts to use SENCER pedagogies to bridge the achievement gap among students and to stimulate greater accomplishment in the sciences by students intending to become teachers. As a SENCER Leadership Fellow, among other things, Gale intends to forge creative collaborations to apply what she calls the “SENCER ethos” to non-traditional instructional platforms, such as on-line instruction.

Dr. Kraig Steffen, Fairfield University
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Fairfield University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

Kraig has hosted an informational workshop on SENCER and course development on campus and plans to continue to foster the creation of courses.

Dr. Eleanor Sterling, American Museum of Natural History
Director of the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Eleanor has introduced SENCER to new colleagues in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology at Columbia, with the view to developing SENCER courses. She has also connected the work of AMNH to SENCER regional and national communities, encouraged greater collaboration between SENCER and NCEP and with AMNH’s program ‘Enhancing Diversity in Conservation Science Initiative’ (EDiCon). Eleanor has created and disseminated new curricular materials and scholarship, especially in relation to active teaching techniques.

Dr. Cheryl Swift, Whittier College
Professor of Biology and Environmental Science, Whittier College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Cheryl has coordinated Whittier’s participation with the SENCER program, developed additional courses that teach science through issues of global consequence, supported regional efforts with the SENCER Center for Innovation-West and in connection with a consortium of colleges that have agreed to limit carbon emissions, and provided workshops and other consultation on the SENCER approach to interested colleagues at Whittier and other institutions.

Dr. James Tait, Southern Connecticut State University
Associate Professor of Science Education and Environmental Studies, Southern Connecticut State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

Jim and his colleague Vincent Breslin, authors of the SENCER Model course Science on the Connecticut Coast: Investigations of an Urbanized Shoreline, plan to work together throughout their terms to continue to refine the course and to support the infusion of the SENCER ideals in all program offerings in the School of Arts and Sciences at SCSU. Topics of interest for possible new course developments include environmental modeling, environmental chemistry, and earth systems.

Dr. Julienne Thomas-Hall, Kennedy-King College
Kennedy-King College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2009

Julienne has been involved with SENCER since first participating in SSI 2005 as a team member. She has been a leader in disseminating SENCER on the Kennedy-King campus, leading small groups and teams to participate in SENCER events and incorporating the approach into her courses. Her tenure project focused on asthma and the urban environment, with a focus on the social justice aspects of the issue.

As a Fellow, Julienne plans to promote SENCER to all Kennedy-King faculty during the college’s professional development week and to coordinate poster and informational sessions to familiarize administrators with the approach and campus-based results. She will also introduce the program and its benefits to members of the Undergraduate Research Collaborative, a partnership with four-year colleges and universities in the Chicago area. Kennedy-King currently works with Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago State University, Hope College, and Illinois State University.

Dr. Richard Thompson, College of Saint Rose
Dean of the School of Mathematics and Sciences, College of Saint Rose
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Richard will guide the development of additional SENCER courses, provide mentoring and development activities for new faculty members, and strengthen collaborations designed to improve the preparation of future science teachers.

Dr. Mary Tiles, Great Britain
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

As professor of philosophy at the University of Hawaii Manoa, Mary collaborated with a colleague to apply SENCER ideals to an economics course, worked with the Climate Change Commission to broaden academic attention to integrate learning, and helped the national SENCER community focus on climate change and sustainability as a subject for expanded SENCER course and program efforts.

Dr. Liana Tsenova, New York City College of Technology
Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, New York City College of Technology
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in August 2013

Liana TsenovaDr. Tsenova has been involved with SENCER since 2009, and since then has implemented the ideals in teaching, mentoring undergraduate student research, and designing several interdisciplinary collaborative projects for students, which have provided the opportunity to conduct research, perform scientific and mathematical analyses, and discuss civic issues. These projects have helped students to better understand the complex interaction between microbiology, epidemiology, and mathematics needed to resolve current public health problems. The Emerging and Honors Scholars Program at City Tech provides an excellent platform for students to get engaged in research. In collaboration with the mathematics department, students investigated the etiology, transmission, symptoms, treatment and prevention of swine flu, focusing on the epidemiology in the US and worldwide. Next, they developed a simulation computational model for the spread of swine flu pandemic. At the end of the semester students summarize and present their work at a poster session, making it available for the whole college community. In fall 2012, one of Liana’s students also presented a project at the 2012 ABRCMS entitled “A Simulation Model for the Spread of Swine Flu Pandemic.”

During her fellowship, Liana plans to disseminate wider the SENCER ideas not only among students, but also among colleagues. The Hudson River Biodiversity Project aims to increase the participation and performance of students in STEM by promoting the interdisciplinary teaching and learning of mathematics, marine biology, and chemistry among undergraduates. Five faculty members new to SENCER will be involved in the project. Currently, the School of Arts and Sciences at City Tech does not offer any interdisciplinary SENCER courses. Liana will design and develop such courses, following the spine model of the US Military Academy. She also plans to host a regional conference at City Tech, and to submit documentation of course results for publication in Science Education and Civic Engagement: An International Journal

Ms. Nellie Tsipoura, New Jersey Audubon
Senior Scientist
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in 2016

Nellie Tsipoura guides people through science into making a deeper connection with wildlife and with the issues that relate to conservation as a civic concern. Through her post in a conservation organization, Nellie is able to provide a wide spectrum of opportunities for more hands-on involvement of students and academic faculty alike. During her fellowship, Nellie intends to apply the SENCER approach to curricula of environmental science classes through a collaboration at two institutions by involving faculty and students in activities related to obtaining the information that managers in coastal areas are currently missing. This data will help achieve increased resilience both for these natural systems and the neighboring communities in view of expected sea level rise. Collaborating with a non-profit conservation organization opens up many new ways for students to look at real-life situations and learn what scientific questions to ask and how to work through to find answers. Furthermore, as a scientist and educator outside of an academic setting, Nellie provides mentorship and learning situations that can lead to both deepening of scientific understanding and positive career and employment outcomes.

Dr. Iris Turkenkopf, Mount Saint Mary College
Vice President for Academic Affairs, Mount Saint Mary College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Iris is promoting the wider adoption of SENCER ideals, developing strategies for improving general education, and consulting with colleagues, locally and nationally, who share similar goals for student achievement and institutional advancement.

Dr. Gregory Van Doren
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Gregory Van DorenAs a Fellow, Greg developed a cross-disciplinary chemistry and art course (focused on natural dyes and fabric art), helped other faculty adopt SENCER pedagogies in their courses, and served on the leadership council for the SENCER Center for Innovation-West.

Dr. Rikki Wagstrom, Metropolitan State University
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Metropolitan State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Rikki Wagstrom

Rikki is an associate professor of mathematics at Metropolitan State University. Since first becoming involved with SENCER, Rikki has developed, piloted, and continually improved upon a curriculum for a college algebra course that focuses on environmental sustainability. Covering all required material for the course, which is both a college algebra prerequisite and general education environmental science credit, has proved challenging. To address this challenge, Rikki began teaching in a “flipped” manner. She recorded math screen casts, which are essentially her lectures on the mathematics component of the course, for students to watch outside of class, allowing for class time to be spent on group activities and complex sustainability problems that had previously been assigned as homework. Since implementing the new method, Rikki has been able to add more content to the course, and her students have been better prepared to tackle the complex sustainability math problems on their own, having done part of the work with each other. This summer, she plans to add closed captioning to the course and to incorporate at least one new math chapter and rewrite another.

Rikki is a part of Engaging Mathematics, NCSCE’s newest initiative, and has taken part in the scholarship of teaching and learning program. She also wrote a chapter about how she applied the scholarship of teaching and learning when developing her sustainability course for Jacqueline Dewar’s forthcoming book.

As a Fellow, Rikki plans to further enhancing her sustainability course, mentor adjunct faculty, work with colleagues to increase retention in math, and present her work to colleagues at national meetings. She will also develop an activity on product life cycle analysis for a math/science camp for middle school-aged girls with a pre-service teacher.

Dr. Greg Wahl, Montgomery College
Professor, Mongomery College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Greg WahlGreg worked with colleagues in the reading and writing centers to continue the development of SENCER related writing projects and, on a national basis, he worked with other community college colleagues to explore using SENCER principles to improve achievement in developmental course taught at the college level.

Dr. Marcia Walsh, Merrimack College
Associate Professor of Health Sciences, Merrimack College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Marcia has promoted wider adoption of SENCER principles in undergraduate courses, engaged and mentored faculty, assessing the special learning needs of pre-service teacher education majors. She has also connected with and supported SENCER’s regional activities in the New England.

Dr. Sally Wasileski, University of North Carolina at Asheville
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Asheville
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2010

Sally co-founded the Food for Thought cluster, a collaboration of 9 natural science, social science and humanities courses (now taught by 7 different faculty) that focus on educating students by engaging them in the science and politics of food information, food consumerism, nutrition and health. Sally serves as the official coordinator and teaches a chemistry course called “The Food of Chemistry,” which engages students in general chemistry concepts through topics of food and cooking. The pedagogical approach in all Food for Thought courses is to engage students across disciplines through cross-course projects and activities. By having students from different courses work together on common projects, chemistry students learn about how the science that they learn fits within the context of nutrition, land economics, sociology of technology, etc. This approach has been successful and rewarding for Food for Thought students and faculty. As a Fellow, Sally would like to help others be able to apply the same techniques in a meaningful and successful way, gain new ideas, and help disseminate those ideas.

Dr. Martha Weller, Middle Tennessee State University
Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Middle Tennessee State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

With her colleague Judith Iriarte-Gross, Mari has continued course development efforts, providing consultation to faculty colleagues who want to develop innovative courses, working to strengthen regional collaborations, and exploring effective ways to encourage students to enroll in SENCER courses early in their college careers.

Dr. Kelly Wentz-Hunter, Roosevelt University
Assistant Professor of Biology, Roosevelt University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Kelly Wentz-HunterKelly Wentz-Hunter, assistant professor of biology at Roosevelt University, has been involved with SENCER since beginning her time at RU. She modified a cellular and molecular biology course after attending her first Summer Institute, and has since designed an upper level course on cancer biology. Kelly plans to present sessions on the SENCER approach and her course revisions/creations to colleagues on campus, regionally, and nationally, and to submit manuscripts on findings from course assessments to peer-reviewed journals. She will also continue to work with her colleagues on-campus to develop new, interdisciplinary courses that incorporate civic engagement.

Dr. Bonnie Williams, University of Akron
Associate Dean, University of Akron
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2009

Bonnie has been a leader in adopting the SENCER approach on the University of Akron campus. As director of the First-Year Learning Communities Program, she is responsible for curricular integration, learning community faculty development, marketing, and oversight of a program that annually has participation by 20% of first-year students. She has coordinated team participation in several SENCER symposia and has served as principal investigator on a post-Institute implementation award that focuses on introducing the SENCER approach into courses meant for first year students. The project has since been supported by an award from the National Science Foundation.

As a Leadership Fellow, Bonnie will lead UA SENCER team members in implementing SENCER into learning communities on two urban campuses and in an Early College science course. A UA faculty learning community will be developed in encourage interest and increase the number of SENCER-related learning communities at the University. Additionally, the team will offer workshops on SENCER to area colleges and develop a multi-disciplinary, civic issue project on campus.

Dr. Donyel Williams, Harold Washington College
Dean of Instruction, Harold Washington College
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in July 2009

Donyel will recruit more faculty members to participate in interdisciplinary collaborations and disseminate results of these partnerships both on campus and across the City Colleges of Chicago system.

Dr. Patricia Wilson, La Salle University
Assistant Professor of Psychology, LaSalle University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Pat has developed a course on addictions and modified her social psychology course to take advantage of the elections as a civic event through which basic psychological principles may be taught and learned. She will continue her campus-based consultations to interested faculty as well as her service in the regional leadership networks.

Dr. Tom Wood, George Mason University
Associate Professor of Integrative and Interdisciplinary Studies at New Century College, George Mason University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

Tom Wood

Tom has provided consultation to others who wish to develop learning communities reflecting SENCER goals and ideas to strengthen community partnerships and experiential learning. He has also helped guide the development of additional SENCER courses at GMU and worked to strengthen partnerships with community colleges, with the view of expanding access to the conservation studies program at the Smithsonian Institution’s Conservation and Research Center.

Dr. Adrienne Wootters, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts
Chair of the Physics Department, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in June 2008

In addition to continuing her work to expand the influence of SENCER ideals in courses and programs at MCLA, Adrienne has worked with collaborators from around the country to focus on general education and K-12 teacher preparation and pursue some research questions on the correlation of student self-assessment of skills and knowledge with the assessments made by teaching professionals.

Dr. Katharine York, Southern New Hampshire University

Dr. Winnie Yu, Southern Connecticut State University
Professor of Computer Science, Southern Connecticut State University
Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in August 2013

Winnie YuDr. Winnie Yu has been a full-time faculty member of the computer science department at Southern Connecticut State University since 1985. Her research interests include college student retention, STEM education, broadening female participation in computing, and in integrating social and psychological approaches to enhance learning. Winnie also served as department chairperson from 1998 to 2010. Among her accomplishments were gaining the initial ABET accreditation of the computer science general undergraduate program and obtaining state approval of the M.S. in computer science graduate program. She was also the driving force in integrating a technological fluency component in the university’s new Liberal Education Program. In her work, Winnie seeks opportunities to put learning theories into practice to create the context for significant learning in science and technology. Building relationships, developing esprit de corps among her peers, and fostering her students to learn and thrive are her most important commitments.

Winnie has a strong interest in promoting STEM in higher education, particularly within the field of technology and computer science. Dr. Yu believes that the big gap between job market demands and student interest in STEM can be, to a great extent, explained by the lack of social and civic engagement in the curriculum. In addition to pedagogical improvement in teaching and learning, SENCER principles can provide a solid foundation to build student engagement. During her fellowship, is her hope to make a difference in increasing student engagement, involvement and success in STEM. Winnie is also a newly appointed Co-Director for the SENCER Center for Innovation-New England.

Dr. Thomas Zachariah, Loyola Marymount University
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University

Elected a SENCER Leadership Fellow in December 2008

Thomas ZachariahThomas Zachariah, associate professor of mathematics at Loyola Marymount University, is the coauthor of the SENCER model course Quantitative Literacy Through Community-Based Group Projects. Thomas, with his colleagues Jackie Dewar and Suzanne Larson, have presented on their model course at SENCER national symposia, a Lilly-West Conference, and the International Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Conference. As a Leadership Fellow, Thomas will work with colleagues to incorporate the SENCER approach into the LEAP program, a living/learning community for first-year biology and natural science students.

National Fellowship Board

Fellows are selected by NCSCE staff and a distinguished national fellowship board following review of applications. The board provides overall guidance to the fellowship program.

  • Dr. David Ferguson, Stony Brook University, chair
  • Dr. Robert Full, University of California—Berkeley
  • Dr. Jay Labov, National Research Council
  • Dr. Cathy Middlecamp, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Dr. Barbara Tewksbury, Hamilton College
  • Mr. David Burns, ex officio
  • Ms. Danielle Kraus Tarka, Program Director

Leadership Fellow and Senior Fellow Applications

Please visit the program page to learn more about eligibility, application requirements, and Fellow matching. The application period is now closed.

SENCER Visiting Scholars

SENCER invites faculty and academic leaders who want to pursue research interests connected to SENCER’s goals and who are willing to devote a sabbatical period to supporting our national dissemination efforts to apply for an appointment as a visiting scholar.

Aim of Program

  • Establish SENCER ideals in practice
  • Develop pedagogical practices
  • Explore strategies for sustaining and implementing reform
  • Encourage affiliations with national disciplinary associations
  • Promote effective assessment strategies
  • Support new areas of application

How to Apply to Become a SENCER Visiting Scholar

Please send a cover letter, a current C.V., and a proposal for your work to ncsce.dc [at] gmail.com or by mail to:

The National Center for Science and Civic Engagement
2000 P St NW
Suite 308
Washington, DC 20036

The Work of the SENCER Visiting Scholar

Scholars generally serve for a semester or year and are designated by their major professional identification, such as “SENCER visiting scientist,” or “SENCER visiting mathematician.”

Visiting scholars do not have to be in residence, but may use the national office when in Washington, DC. While SENCER offers no salary subvention, we do provide modest support for travel, presentations at relevant meetings, and other activities.

Past Visiting Scholars

 

Dennis Lehman
Harold Washington College
(Chemistry)